Home > Food, Recipe > Japanese-style curry: the easy way

Japanese-style curry: the easy way

I love Japanese style curry. Japanese style curry and (good) ramen are two of my comfort foods from Japan. It totally thwarts any efforts I have to eat totally vegetarian today, but we got the beef from a cow that Tim’s uncle raised, so I am mostly okay with that.

Let’s just start with that this recipe makes use of a concentrated curry roux block, which is not “real” food. Read the ingredients, I don’t know what half of them are. I don’t know how to make this any other way… but trust me, it might not be “real,” but it is good.

I usually pick up Vermont curry medium-hot (not hot at all, actually) from our local Asian grocer, Tsai Grocery.

Of course you can put this amazing-ness over rice, but that’s a little simple and expected.

How about with some breaded pork cutlets? (Katsu-kare)

Or how about over udon noodles? (Warning, close-up food porn.)

Japanese curry is not like what you think of with Indian or Thai curries. It is not overly spicy and is more like a beef stew served over rice, udon noodles, inside of bread, with breaded pork.’

Japanese style curry

makes about 8 servings, ~2 cups each

Ingredients
Whole block (12 little squares) of Curry Roux
6 cups of Water
1.5 pounds of meat (beef, chicken, lamb). I used stew beef.
2 big potatoes, peeled and cut into small chunks
2 big carrots, peeled and cut into circles
An onion, if you like (I don’t like…)

That’s all! Add all ingredients to a crock pot and set to high.
Cook on high for around 4 hours, then set to low. I stir every once in a while to break up the curry blocks.

Pro-tip: Before adding curry roux to the crock pot, cut it up into thin slices. You could ever omit a cup of water from the crock pot and dissolve the curry roux in a cup of hot water, then add it to the crock pot mixture.

This is the way I made curry on Sunday afternoon and when I took it from the crock pot and into a Tupperware it made ONE GALLON of curry.

To Serve
Serve side by side with hot white rice or over udon noodles. You can also taste your skill at making some pork katsu and adding that to make katsu-kare, another popular way to eat this dish.

All done!
My version is not nearly as spectacular looking as those above… but that’s not what really matters, right?!

This keeps very well in the fridge for about a week (any fat will congeal on the surface and is easily picked off) and also keeps well in the freezer in an air tight container.

Again, this is the easy way to make Japanese curry. I found some recipes online for a DIY method without the curry block. I’ll have to try that too sometime and compare the taste.

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  1. January 15, 2011 at 22:06

    This looks good! We only use the curry cubes when we’re camping, but I’ve been thinking about trying them at home some time, too. I agree it’s probably not ‘real’ food, but sometimes we make an exception. Good thing it’s lunch time!

    • shortystylee
      January 16, 2011 at 08:51

      I wish I had paid more attention to what my host mother was cooking! I’m stuck now trying to make Japanese food but only knowing how to do it the “easy way.” I could get myself a Japanese cookbook, but every one I’ve looked at so far is not food that I’m interested in… it’s never food that I think real people in Japan eat, if that makes sense.

  1. January 15, 2011 at 08:00

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